IRC awardees help track 'lost generation'

The National Youth Council of Ireland has released its Time to Go? report, a qualitative study exploring the experience and impact of emigration on Ireland’s youth over the past two years. The results provide an insight into the opportunities and difficulties faced by young emigrants in Canada, the UK and beyond. The report references the innovative and extremely important work of the IRCHSS-funded project 'Emigre':

"Researchers in University College Cork have recently commenced a research project entitled ‘Emigre’ to profile and track contemporary emigrants using data drawn from the new Small Area (SA) Population Statistics developed for the 2011 Census. The study is using a number of key variables from the 2011 Census including age profile, employment levels, education levels, degree of rurality, family structure and housing stock, to build a new map of Ireland embodying a level of complexity and detail never previously possible.

"The ‘Emigre’ study is constructing a population sample based on a series of rural and urban SAs and differentiated by socio-economic and educational background. A detailed profile of emigrants, supplemented by interviews, will be developed, focusing on destination, occupation and stated intention to return.

"The study to map and track contemporary emigration from Ireland is funded by a major IRCHSS award and is based at the Department of Geography, and the Institute for Social Sciences in the 21st Century (ISS21) at University College Cork. The research team consists of Dr. Irial Glynn, Dr. Piaras Mac Éinrí (Principal Investigator) and Tomás Kelly.

"Further details of this research including the online emigrant survey are available on the http://www.ucc.ie/en/emigre/ website. Such an innovative approach to mapping the profile of this current wave of emigrants promises to generate extremely important data to inform the development of an appropriate policy response to emigration."

For more information, check out this article in the Irish Independent or visit the NCYI website at www.youth.ie.